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Home Burglary Suspect Arrested

LAS VEGAS -- Metro Police arrested a suspect in connection with a home burglary that was caught on camera. 

According to police, they arrested 23-year-old Austin Jones Saturday on charges of burglary and violating conditions of a suspended sentence. 

He had previous convictions for home invasion, burglary with a deadly weapon, burglary, attempted burglary and possession of a firearm by a prohibited person.

According to the arrest report released Tuesday, Jones is on probation and is on house arrest.

Police say Jones broke into a home near Wigwam Avenue and Eastern Avenue at about 3:40 p.m. Thursday through a ground-floor window. He took a black backpack, a five gallon water bottle filled with coins and cash, a rolling suitcase and a gold ring, according to police.

Coroner ID's Man Killed in Sunday Morning Crash

The Clark County Coroner's office has identified the man killed in a crash early Sunday morning as 23-year-old Brian Jared Peters.

The coroner says he died from multiple blunt force trauma.

Peters was a passenger in a car that crashed into a wall near Pebble Road and Carnegie Street at about 2:20 a.m.

At the intersection, drivers must turn right or left, but according to Henderson Police, the driver of the car, 24-year-old Arnold Cheung, continued straight and hit a block wall.

Both Cheung and Peters were trapped in the car. Rescue crews had to extricate Cheung from the car. He was taken to Sunrise Hospital's Trauma Unit for treatment. Peters died at the scene.

Police believe speed and alcohol may be factors in the crash. Blood was drawn from Cheung at the hospital. He will face DUI with death charges, if his blood alcohol content was above the legal limit, police said.

Sobriety Checkpoint Planned for Friday

Sobriety Checkpoint Planned for Friday

Henderson Police will be part of this weekend's effort to keep the roads safe from drunk drivers.

Henderson Police will be joining forces with Metro, North Las Vegas Police and the Nevada Highway Patrol for a series of sobriety checkpoints throughout southern Nevada.

The checkpoint will be from 7 p.m. Friday to 3 a.m. Saturday in the area of St. Rose Parkway and Eastern Avenue.

Most people think New Year's is the most dangerous holiday for the roadways; however, according to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration statistics for 2011, far more fatalities happen over the Labor Day weekend.

In Clark County last year, there were two fatal accidents during the Labor Day weekend and a total of four accident-related deaths statewide.

It is a requirement of Nevada law that the location of a DUI checkpoint be released prior to the date of the event. 

Driving You Crazy: Speed Limit on Sunridge Heights Parkway

HENDERSON, Nev. - A viewer says the speed limit on Sunridge Heights Parkway between Horizon Ridge Parkway and Eastern Avenue is too low. She also says there aren't enough posted speed limit signs.

The 35-mile-per-hour speed limit on Sunridge Heights is due to the vertical and horizontal road geometry. The road contains an elevation change and several curves. Spacing of driveways along those curves has also created visibility concerns. Additionally, undeveloped land with no street lights sits along a portion of this parkway, making the slower speed limit a necessity.

Transportation officials say once improvements are complete in the area, the city will re-examine this section of road to determine if the speed limit can be raised. That speed survey will happen.

As far as signage, seven speed limit signs sit along this stretch of road.

Mexican-style Rodeo is Canceled at South Point

Mexican-style Rodeo is Canceled at South Point

LAS VEGAS (AP) -- Officials at the South Point casino in Las Vegas say plans for a Mexican-style rodeo at the property next month have been canceled.

Steve Stallworth of the South Point Arena and Equestrian Center confirmed Friday the World Series of Charreria was called off. The rodeo looked unlikely after Tuesday, when Clark County commissioners upheld a ban on horse roping events.

Animal rights activists say roping a horse's legs can trip the animal and cause serious injury. Event organizers say cowboys catch and release the horses, and intentional tripping is against internal policy.

Commissioners heard hours of impassioned testimony from both sides before voting 3-3 on a temporary moratorium on the county's horse roping ban.

The split vote killed the moratorium, but commissioners plan to revisit the underlying ordinance in coming weeks.

I-Team: County Commission Revisits Horse Tripping Issue

LAS VEGAS -- Horse roping is called animal cruelty by some, and living history by others.

Clark County commissioners will decide Tuesday whether to ban rodeos with controversial horse roping events.

Horse roping usually takes place at traditional Latin American rodeos including one scheduled for late September at South Point Casino.

Animal welfare activists hope they can beat back a new attempt by two commissioners to allow the horse roping event to continue.

"The majority of the horses that we use are actually rescues," said Tobias de la Torre, Charros Federation USA CEO. "We bring them in. They're undesirable horses that maybe didn't work out as a saddle horse, have bad habits, and or are abandoned, undesirable horses. We bring them in and we train them."

DragonRidge Country Club Up for Sale

LAS VEGAS -- One of southern Nevada's most exclusive country clubs is for sale.

The golf course at DragonRidge is one of the top courses in the Las Vegas valley.

It is a favorite among players, many of whom pay $250 a round to play there. However, these days, private clubs like DragonRidge are having a hard time, because too many high rollers were hurt by the recession.

Richard MacDonald is one of the few developers in southern Nevada who did not go bankrupt in the recession.

He successfully developed MacDonald Highlands in Henderson and built DragonRidge Country Club, sinking $53 million into the golf course.

Now, he has decided to sell the club for between $12 and $15 million.

It is not that he needs the money. He says his development business is humming again. People are buying lots and building has restarted in the highlands, but the golf course, like many courses these days, is struggling to make money.